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How Mosquitoes Suck Your Blood

By November 28, 2018Uncategorized

We all know mosquitoes suck your blood, but most people don’t know exactly how they do so. The answer is a bit more complicated than you may think. Scientists recently discovered that the proboscis, what mosquitoes use to pierce your skin, is comprised of 6 thin needle-like structures called stylets’. Each of these needles has their own job. Let’s start with the maxillae. The maxillae both have tiny teeth. These teeth are incredibly sharp, which is one reason why you rarely ever feel mosquitoes bite you. Another set of needles, called mandibles, hold the tissues apart while the mosquito sucks blood. The other two needles are the labrum and the hypopharynx. The labrum and the hypopharynx work together. While the labrum is the most important, as it is houses the receptors that allow the mosquito to actually find the blood vessel, it wouldn’t be effective without the hypopharynx. The hypopharynx lays over the gutter-shaped labrum to form a straw-like mouthpart. The hypopharynx is also the piece that allows the mosquito to inject their saliva into our body. This saliva allows the blood to keep flowing and not coagulate once it is exposed to the air. Mosquito saliva is also the cause of the itchy bumps that appear on our skin once we are bitten.

Who would have thought those little insects would have such an interesting and intricate anatomy?! Luckily, there is a way from preventing mosquitoes from sticking you with those 6 little needles! The answer? DynaTrap! Get yours today!