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Nearly every region in the United States was affected by or is still being affected by, the vast amounts of mosquitoes that took over this year. But, why was this year so bad for mosquitoes? The answer: the weather. Spring of 2018 was particularly wet. More rain means more standing water for mosquitoes to lay their eggs in. A female mosquito lays eggs in batches of 100 to 200 eggs and needs only about an inch of water in order to do so.

After spring, of course, comes summer, and the summer of 2018 was a hot one. Mosquitoes begin to breed and remain active as long as temperatures are above 45°F, and become even more active as temperatures rise. Not only does warmer weather increase mosquito activity, but it also increases their ability to spread viruses such as Zika and West Nile. The warm air allows for the viruses to incubate in the mosquitoes for a longer period of time, allowing them to infect more people.

While some people may consider fall and winter to be “mosquito-free”, this is not necessarily true. If temperatures do not fall below 45°F, the mosquitoes will survive. If temperatures are above 45°F they will keep breeding and multiplying. If temperatures do fall below 45°F, some mosquitoes go dormant and wait for warmer weather, while some are unable to withstand the colder weather and die. The map below shows the months that are considered “mosquito season” for each region.

In order to prevent mosquitoes during these seasons make sure your DynaTrap is up and running about a week prior to the start and continues to run throughout the entire season!